Introduction – Within the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulatory framework, there are three primary regulations that govern the airworthiness of an aircraft generally known as “The Big Three”, which are: 14 CFR Part 21 — Certification Procedures for Products and Parts 14 CFR Part 43 — Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, Rebuilding, and Alterations 14 CFR…

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Introduction – The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is one of the major aviation regulatory bodies with aspects of its Part 145 certificate application process that differ from other aviation regulators. Though the 14 CFR Part 145 certification process provides for interaction between the applicant and the FAA from initial inquiry to certificate issuance, gaining…

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Introduction – On June 1, 2016, the FAA and EASA released Maintenance Annex Guidance, Change 6 (“MAG 6″). The MAG details EASA, FAA, and applicant actions required to be taken in order for an FAA-certificated 14 CFR part 145 repair station located in the U.S. to be approved to EASA Part-145; and for a EU…

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Introduction – The FAA receiving inspection system for aircraft parts and material aims to establish traceability and that parts were manufactured in accordance with 14 CFR Part 21, were previously determined to be airworthy under 14 CFR Part 43, and produced to established industry standards. For an operator or repair station to ensure these requirements…

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Introduction – The FAA receiving inspection system for aircraft parts and material aims to establish traceability and that parts were manufactured in accordance with 14 CFR Part 21, were previously determined to be airworthy under 14 CFR Part 43, and produced to established industry standards. For an operator or maintenance organisation to ensure these requirements…

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Introduction – Recognising that a common set of standards would not only benefit the aviation industry economically, but also preserve a high level of safety, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) began an effort in 1988 to harmonize their respective aviation standards. With the JAA becoming defunct in 2009, and…

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Introduction – The Overseas Territories Aviation Requirements (OTARs) describe the means by which aircraft operators, aviation personnel and providers of services can gain approvals, licences and certificates and the process through which these are maintained. This process ensures adequate levels of safety and internationally agreed standards are met. Overseas Territories Aviation Circulars (OTACs) are issued…

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Introduction – The Overseas Territories Aviation Requirements (OTARs) describe the means by which aircraft operators, aviation personnel and providers of services can gain approvals, licences and certificates and the process through which these are maintained. This process ensures adequate levels of safety and internationally agreed standards are met. Overseas Territories Aviation Circulars (OTACs) are issued…

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Introduction – The Overseas Territories Aviation Requirements (OTARs) describe the means by which aircraft operators, aviation personnel and providers of services can gain approvals, licences and certificates and the process through which these are maintained. This process ensures adequate levels of safety and internationally agreed standards are met. Overseas Territories Aviation Circulars (OTACs) are issued…

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Introduction – The Overseas Territories Aviation Requirements (OTARs) describe the means by which aircraft operators, aviation personnel and providers of services can gain approvals, licences and certificates and the process through which these are maintained. This process ensures adequate levels of safety and internationally agreed standards are met. Overseas Territories Aviation Circulars (OTACs) are issued…

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